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In Canada, safety and the law changes every 15 are you compliant!

In Canada the law changes in each province and FEDERALLY every 15 days of the year, are you up to date, are your teams current with the proper knowledge and have you reviewed the standards that play important roles in the safety operations of your company not just in protecting your workers but in how the company must run based upon the new standards.

As a safety professional and as supervisor you must know and understand fully the Occupational health and safety law in every jurisdiction in Canada – provincial, federal and territorial. It reviews health and safety law thematically and includes commentary, case law and practical analysis. It clearly sets out the statutes and regulations required for a solid understanding of your companies  obligations, and each court and tribunal decision helps you determine how to reduce or avoid liability.

Must-know information includes:

·        The internal responsibility system

·        The requirements for workplace joint health and safety committees and health and safety representatives

·        The legal defence of due diligence

·        Statutes, regulations, policy and case law that make up Canadian health and safety law

·        The right to refuse unsafe work

·        The authority of government inspectors in the workplace

·        Judicial interpretation of the statutes and regulations

·        Workplace Hazardous Materials Information System (WHMIS2015)

·        Restrictions regarding smoking in the workplace

·        Transportation of dangerous goods in Canada

·        Alcohol and drugs in the workplace …

Have you looked at or reviewed the current legislation and how the standards apply to your province or provinces such as ( not with standing): Behind each action in law there is case law that compels the company or supervisor to act

Ontario

·        Duty to provide a safe work environment

·        Duty to educate and train workers

·        Duty to provide workers with written instructions

·        Duty to have occupational health and safety policy

·        Duty to appoint competent supervision

·        Duty to employ workers of legal age

·        Duty to assist health and safety representatives

·        Duty to comply with regulations

·        Duty to post copy of statute

·        Duty to establish an occupational health service

·        Duty to keep records of biological, chemical and physical agent

·        Duty to take every precaution reasonable

·        Ontario. Notice of death or critical injury

·        Industrial establishments

·        Construction projects

·        Mining operations

·        Mealth care and residential facilities

·        Notice of non-critical injury

·        Industrial establishments

·        Construction projects

·        Mining operations

·        Health care and residential facilities

·        Notice of occupational illness

Alberta

·        Duty to provide a safe work environment

·        Duty to educate and train workers

·        Duty to provide workers with written instructions

·        Duty to have occupational health and safety policy

·        Duty to appoint competent supervision

·        Differences from Workers’ Compensation Reporting

·        Limits of Accident Reporting Requirements

·        Government Use of Information Reported

·        Legal Liability for Not Reporting

·        Self-Incrimination Effect of Accident Reporting

·        Role of Legal Counsel Before Reporting

·        Due Diligence Implications of Accident Reporting Obligations .

SO HOW CURRENT ARE YOU IN YOUR FIELD OR AS A SUPERVISOR!

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