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Hurricane Risks and Safety who has this program in their safety manuals!

As Hurricane Mathew decides to give the USA SE coast a run for their money on preparedness and community involvement, I am reminded of the key word PREPAREDNESS, these storm don’t just pop up or happen, they develop with TIME LINES and Prevention Stages for people to react and set in measure the protections that they could need. The Atlantic hurricane season is June 1 through November 30 each year. Hurricanes are dangerous and destructive. Known also as cyclones and typhoons in other parts of the world, hurricanes cause high winds, flooding, heavy rain, and storm surges (high tidal waves).

Have your read and observed important pre data like:https://www.miamidade.gov/hurricane/library/guide-to-hurricane-readiness.pdf, they dont print and publish this data for it to sit on a shelf and be ignored they give you great knowledge and how to prepare!

When a watch or warning has been issued by the local government

  • Leave low lying areas.
  • Protect windows with plywood boards, or storm shutters.
  • Secure outside objects.
  • Make sure you have plenty of fuel and water.
  • Have several days supply of food and water for each family member.
  • If called to evacuate, do so immediately.

Before the Storm

  • Be ready to put your plan and preparation into action.
  • Pay attention to local weather reports on radio, television, or the internet.
  • Have house boarded up, or have storm shutters in place.
  • Have plenty of food and water.
  • Make sure all your tools, supplies, and first aid kit available for use.
  • Have a secure room available.

During the Storm

  • Stay in Secure Room.
  • Stay away from windows.
  • Do not use the phone, or candles.
  • Monitor Weather and Civil Service Bulletins on either regular or NOAA radio.
  • Have supplies on hand.
  • Remain indoors when the eye moves over your area because the storm will resume shortly.

After the Storm

  • Make sure that all is definitely clear outside, and the storm has completely passed before going out.
  • Report downed power lines, and stay away from them.
  • Use stored water and food.
  • Be patient. Things will take a while before they get back to normal.

When the power grid goes down, and you are sitting in the dark

A basic emergency supply kit could include the following recommended items:

  • Water, one gallon of water per person per day for at least three days, for drinking and sanitation
  • Food, at least a three-day supply of non-perishable food
  • Battery-powered or hand crank radio and a NOAA Weather Radio with tone alert and extra batteries for both
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • First aid kit
  • Whistle to signal for help
  • Dust mask to help filter contaminated air and plastic sheeting and duct tape to shelter-in-place
  • Moist towelettes, garbage bags and plastic ties for personal sanitation
  • Wrench or pliers to turn off utilities
  • Manual can opener for food
  • Local maps
  • Cell phone with chargers, inverter or solar charger

It only takes one storm to change your life and community. Tropical cyclones are among nature’s most powerful and destructive phenomena. If you live in an area prone to tropical cyclones, you need to be prepared. Even areas well away from the coastline can be threatened by dangerous flooding, destructive winds and tornadoes from these storms. The National Hurricane Center and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center issue watches, warnings, forecasts, and analyses of hazardous tropical weather.

Hurricane warning = conditions are expected within 36 hrs.

Steps to take:

  • Follow evacuation orders from local officials, if given.
  • Check-in with family and friends by texting or using social media.
  • Follow the hurricane timeline preparedness checklist, depending on when the storm is anticipated to hit and the impact that is projected for your location.
  • If you’re not in an area that is recommended for evacuation, plan to stay at home or where you are and let friends and family know where you are.
  • Close storm shutters, and stay away from windows. Flying glass from broken windows could injure you.
  • Turn your refrigerator or freezer to the coldest setting and open only when necessary. If you lose power, food will last longer. Keep a thermometer in the refrigerator to be able to check the food temperature when the power is restored.
  • Turn on your TV/radio, or check your city/county website every 30 minutes in order to get the latest weather updates and emergency instructions.

Like but not limited too in the United States;

Emergency Plans

Develop and document plans for your specific risks.

Health & Environment

Follow guidelines to guard your community’s health and protect the environment during and after the storm.

Evacuation

  • Review the FEMA Evacuation Guidelines to allow for enough time to pack and inform friends and family if you need to leave your home. FOLLOW instructions issued by local officials. Leave immediately if ordered!
  • Consider your protection options to decide whether to stay or evacuate your home if you are not ordered to evacuate.
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