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If you have Chemicals on site WINDSOCKS are Critical Safety Risk Assessment Tool or do we use the flag!

Pending if you live in Canada or USA there are small real differences you need to know in your risk  assessment, “I wonder if they told the wind this math formula”?

windsock is a conical textile tube which resembles a giant sock. Windsocks typically are used at the airports to indicate the direction and strength of the wind to pilots and at chemical plants where there is risks of gaseous leakage. They are sometimes located alongside highways at windy locations.

Wind direction is the opposite of the direction in which the windsock is pointing (note that wind directions are conventionally specified as being the compass point from which the wind originates; so a windsock pointing due north indicates a southerly wind). Wind speed is indicated by the windsock’s angle relative to the mounting pole; in low winds, the windsock droops; in high winds it flies horizontally.

Per USA Windsock standards referenced below, a 15-knot (28 km/h; 17 mph) wind will fully extend the properly functioning windsock. A 3-knot (5.6 km/h; 3.5 mph) breeze will cause the properly functioning windsock to orient itself according to the wind.

Per Canada Windsock standards: a 15-knot (28 km/h; 17 mph) wind will fully extend the wind sock, a 10-knot (19 km/h; 12 mph) wind will cause the wind sock to be 5° below the horizontal, a 6-knot (11 km/h; 6.9 mph) wind will cause the wind sock to be 30° below the horizontal.

I wonder what Admiral Beaufort would have thought of these two standards his was around since 1805!

Force 0 

Strength: Calm
Speed: Less than 1 mile per hour (mph), less than 2 kilometers per hour (kph)
Observations: Tree leaves don’t move, smoke rises vertically, sea is calm


Force 1 

Strength: Light Air
Speed: 1-3 mph, 2-6 kph
Observations: Tree leaves don’t move, smoke drifts slowly, sea is lightly rippled


Force 2 

Strength: Slight Breeze
Speed: 4-7 mph, 7-11 kph
Observations: Tree leaves rustle, flags wave slightly, small wavelets or scale waves


Force 3 

Strength: Gentle Breeze
Speed: 8-12 mph, 12-19 kph
Observations: Leaves and twigs in constant motion, small flags extended, long unbreaking waves


Force 4 

Strength: Moderate Breeze
Speed: 13-18 mph, 20-29 kph
Observations: Small branches move, flags flap, waves with some whitecaps


Force 5 

Strength: Fresh Breeze
Speed: 19-24 mph, 30-39 kph
Observations: Small trees sway, flags flap and ripple, moderate waves with many whitecapes


Force 6 

Strength: Strong Breeze
Speed: 25-31 mph, 40-50 kph
Observations: Large branches sway, flags beat and pop, larger waves with regular whitecaps


Force 7 

Strength: Moderate Gale
Speed: 32-38 mph, 51-61 kph
Observations: Whole trees sway, large waves (“heaping sea”)


Force 8 

Strength: Fresh Gale
Speed: 39-46 mph, 62-74
Observations: Twigs break off trees, moderately high sea with blowing foam


Force 9 

Strength: Strong Gale
Speed: 47-54 mph, 75-87 kph
Observations: Branches break off trees, shingles blown from roofs, hight crested waves


Force 10 

Strength: Whole Gale
Speed: 55-63 mph, 88-101 kph
Observations: Some trees blown down, damage to buildings, high churning white sea


Force 11 

Strength: Storm
Speed: 64-74 mph, 101 kph-119 kph
Observations: Widespread damage to trees and buildings, mountainous waves


Force 12 

Strength: Hurricane
Speed: 75 mph or greater, 120 kph or greater
Observations: Severe and extensive damage

Inuk3

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