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Local Emergency could mean your safety butt has to move NOW!

In 2016 so FAR, we in North America have had some off the page disasters and emergencies and the new media and local PIO staff have been helpful in informing us all on the tragic events.  But how many folks after EACH event or before the event based on the last one, have a bag and go kit!

Hazards and their effects can come without advanced warning and from any direction. A wise person prepares one or more emergency kits that include enough supplies for every person in the household for at least three days.  Hazards and their effects can come without advanced warning and from any direction. A wise person prepares one or more emergency kits that include enough supplies for every person in the household for at least three days.

If you live in a disaster-prone area (earthquakes, typhoons, Tsunamis, blizzards, and floods), extending to a five day supply is recommended. You need to be prepared to shelter at work for at least 24 hours. Make sure you have food and water and other necessities like medicines in your kit. Also, be sure to have comfortable walking shoes at your workplace in case an evacuation requires walking long distances.

The reasons are these:

  • The Need to Act Fast: You may be forced to react quickly without time to gather supplies that you have spread throughout the house.
  • Isolation:It may be some time before you are able to get out of the house to go shopping.
  • High Demand for Last-Minute Emergency Supplies:With advanced notice of many natural hazards, you may find empty shelves as demand exceeds supply.
  • Supplies, Services and Communication May be Cut Off:Basic services may be cut off for days or weeks after a disaster. Your supplies should contain items that help you during electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment, and telephone outages.
  • Limited Access to Medical Attention:You or a family member may have very specific needs, such as daily medications, that would have adverse effects if not taken.
  • Ask individuals to do three key things: get an emergency supply kit, make a family emergency plan, and be informed about the different types of emergencies that could occur and their appropriate responses.

Because you never know when a disaster will strike, it is recommended that you have kits at home and portable versions that you can maintain in your car or at work. These kits will enable your family to respond to an emergency quickly and will be useful whether you have to shelter in place or evacuate.

The main items to include in your kit are water, food, and first aid supplies. Be sure to include copies of important personal documents such as birth and marriage certificates, titles, and bill, mortgage, and insurance information. (These can be electronic copies on durable storage media such as a thumb drive, which can be easily carried and updated.) You may also need to include additional supplies to meet the needs of any children, pets, or special-needs family members. Throughout the year, the contents of your kit should change depending on your family’s needs, the season, and the situation.

If you live in a disaster-prone area (earthquakes, typhoons, Tsunamis, blizzards, and floods), extending to a five day supply is recommended.

The reasons are these:

  • The Need to Act Fast: You may be forced to react quickly without time to gather supplies that you have spread throughout the house.
  • Isolation:It may be some time before you are able to get out of the house to go shopping.
  • High Demand for Last-Minute Emergency Supplies:With advanced notice of many natural hazards, you may find empty shelves as demand exceeds supply.
  • Supplies, Services and Communication May be Cut Off:Basic services may be cut off for days or weeks after a disaster. Your supplies should contain items that help you during electricity, gas, water, sewage treatment, and telephone outages.
  • Limited Access to Medical Attention:You or a family member may have very specific needs, such as daily medications, that would have adverse effects if not taken.

Because you never know when a disaster will strike, it is recommended that you have kits at home and portable versions that you can maintain in your car or at work. These kits will enable your family to respond to an emergency quickly and will be useful whether you have to shelter in place or evacuate.

The main items to include in your kit are water, food, and first aid supplies. Be sure to include copies of important personal documents such as birth and marriage certificates, titles, and bill, mortgage, and insurance information. (These can be electronic copies on durable storage media such as a thumb drive, which can be easily carried and updated.) You may also need to include additional supplies to meet the needs of any children, pets, or special-needs family members. Throughout the year, the contents of your kit should change depending on your family’s needs, the season, and the situation.

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