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S.S.D. Hand TOOL safety includes preventing DROPPED Objects

Historically, dropped objects have played a principal role in oil and gas incidents. This situation should not be tolerated or allowed to continue. We must eliminate this type of incident.  DO YOU, HAVE YOU, talked about SSD Secondary securing devices?

Dropped objects is a collective issue and not just an operator or a rig owner’s problem; it is a common problem for everyone in our industry. It’s important to note that while dropping a screwdriver from a distance of a few feet is generally no big deal, dropping it from a height of two or three stories could be potentially dangerous. Without a hard hat, being struck by a screwdriver dropped from a height of two stories could be potentially fatal. Even with a hard hat, heavier tools can be the source of significant injuries when dropped from above. Therefore, it is vitally important for anyone working at height to properly secure tools and other objects so they won’t fall.

Energy sources to TALK ABOUT WITH STAFF are:

Gravity – Enables objects to fall, roofs to collapse and people to trip and fall

Motion – The movement of vehicles, vessels, water, wind or even body movement

 

Two Key Principles

  • Do it safely or not at all.
  • There is always time to do it right.

As a COMPETENT WORKER on and SITE you will ALWAYS:

  1. Operate within design and environmental limits.
  2. Operate in a safe and controlled condition.
  3. Ensure safety devices are in place and functioning.
  4. Follow safe work practices and procedures.
  5. Meet or exceed customer’s requirements.
  6. Maintain integrity of dedicated systems.
  7. Comply with all applicable rules and regulations.
  8. Address abnormal conditions.
  9. Follow written procedures for high risk or unusual situations.
  10. Involve the right people in decisions that affect procedures and equipment.

When using hand tools? Dropped object are:

“Any object, with the potential to cause death, injury or equipment/environmental damage, that falls from its previous static position under its own weight.”

When referring to dropped objects, consider:

  • Hand tools being used at heights
  • Hand tools/equipment left behind after working at height
  • Operations conducted at height
  • Equipment mounted at a height that, following contact, vibration or environmental conditions, could fall, i.e., piping, lights, cameras, rigging gear, etc.
  • Temporary equipment at height
  • Where personnel are working on a level directly below the work site
  • Lifting operations

Always provide training on how to choose the right tool for the job, how to correctly use each tool, and how to identify when tools need repair.

  • Select the right tool for the job. Substitutes increase the chance of having an accident.
  • Use tools designed to allow wrist to stay straight. Avoid using hand tools with your wrist bent.
  • Ensure that employees are properly trained in the safe use of hand tools.
  • Use good quality tools.
  • Keep tools in good condition at all times.
  • Inspect tools for defects before use. Replace or repair defective tools.
  • Keep cutting tools sharp and cover sharp edges with suitable covering to protect the tool and to prevent injuries from unintended contact.
  • Replace cracked, splintered, or broken handles on files, hammers, screwdrivers, or sledges.
  • Ensure that the handles of tools like hammers and axes fit tightly into the head of the tool.
  • Replace worn jaws on wrenches, pipe tools and pliers.
  • Redress burred or mushroomed heads of striking tools.
  • Pull on a wrench or pliers. Never push unless you hold the tool with your palm open.
  • Point sharp tools (e.g., saws, chisels, knives) laying on benches away from aisles and handles should not extend over the edge of the bench top.
  • Maintain tools carefully. Keep them clean and dry, and store them properly after each use.
  • Carry tools in a sturdy tool box to and from the worksite.
  • Wear safety glasses or goggles, or a face shield (with safety glasses or goggles) and well-fitting gloves appropriate for the hazards to which you may be exposed when doing various tasks.
  • Keep the work environment clean and tidy to avoid clutter which may cause accidents.
  • Use a heavy belt or apron and hang tools at your sides, not behind your back.

When and how should you inspect powered hand tools?

  • Inspect tools for any damage prior to each use.
  • Check the handle and body casing of the tool for cracks or other damage.
  • If the tool has auxiliary or double handles, check to see that they installed securely.
  • Inspect cords for defects: check the power cord for cracking, fraying, and other signs of wear or faults in the cord insulation.
  • Check for damaged switches and ones with faulty trigger locks.
  • Inspect the plug for cracks and for missing, loose or faulty prongs.

What should you do if you find a tool defective?

  • If a tool is defective, remove it from service, and tag it clearly “Out of service for repair”.
  • Replace damaged equipment immediately – do not use defective tools “temporarily”.
  • Have tools repaired by a qualified person – do not attempt field repairs.

What should you do before using powered hand tools?

  • Ensure that you have been properly trained to use the tool safely. Read the operator’s manual before using the tool and operate the tool according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use only tested and approved tools.
  • Ensure that the power tool has the correct guard, shield or other attachment that the manufacturer recommends.
  • Prevent shocks. Ensure that the tools are properly grounded using a three-prong plug, are double-insulated (and are labelled as such), or are powered by a low-voltage isolation transformer: this will protect users from an electrical shock.
  • Check electric tools to ensure that a tool with a 3-prong plug has an approved 3-wire cord and is grounded. The three-prong plug should be plugged in a properly grounded 3-pole outlet. If an adapter must be used to accommodate a two-hole receptacle, the adapter wire must be attached to a known, functioning ground. NEVER remove the third, grounding prong from a plug.
Hammer Safety
  1. Use a claw hammer for pulling nails and for driving nails.
  2. Do not strike nails or other objects with the “cheek” of the hammer.
  3. Do not strike one hammer against another hammer.
  4. Do not use a hammer, screwdriver, file, etc., if your hands are oily, greasy or wet.
Power Drill Safety
  1. Use brushes or vacuum machinery to remove metal chips, shavings and other debris from the drill table. Do not use your bare hands.
  2. Do not use dull, cracked or bent drill bits.
Power Saw Safety
  1. Keep control of saws by releasing downward pressure at the end of the stroke.
  2. Do not use a saw that has a dull blade.
  3. Oil saw blades after each use of the saw.
  4. Keep your hands and fingers away from the saw blade while you are using the saw.
  5. Do not carry a saw by the blade.
Hand Files & Rasp Safety
  1. Do not use a file as a pry bar, hammer, screwdriver or chisel.
  2. When using a file or a rasp, grasp the handle in one hand and the toe of the file in the other.
  3. Do not hammer on a file.
Chisel Safety
  1. Use a chisel that has been sharpened; do not use a chisel that has a dull cutting edge.
  2. Hold a chisel by using a tool holder if possible.
  3. Clamp small work pieces in the vise and chip towards the stationary jaw when you are working with a chisel.
Tool Boxes, Tool Chests & Cabinets
  1. Use the handle when opening and closing a drawer or door of a tool box, chest, or cabinet.
  2. Tape over or file off sharp edges on tool boxes, chests or cabinets.
  3. Do not stand on tool boxes, chests or cabinets to gain extra height.
  4. Lock the wheels on large tool boxes, chests or cabinets to prevent them from rolling.
  5. Push large chests, cabinets and tool boxes; do not pull them.
  6. Do not open more than one drawer of a tool box at a time.
  7. Close and lock all drawers and doors before moving the tool chest to a new location.
  8. Do not use a tool box or chest as a workbench.
  9. Do not move a tool box, chest or cabinet if it has loose tools or parts on the top.

 

Historically, dropped objects have played a principal role in oil and gas incidents. This situation should not be tolerated or allowed to continue. We must eliminate this type of incident.  DO YOU, HAVE YOU, talked about SSD Secondary securing devices?

Dropped objects is a collective issue and not just an operator or a rig owner’s problem; it is a common problem for everyone in our industry. It’s important to note that while dropping a screwdriver from a distance of a few feet is generally no big deal, dropping it from a height of two or three stories could be potentially dangerous. Without a hard hat, being struck by a screwdriver dropped from a height of two stories could be potentially fatal. Even with a hard hat, heavier tools can be the source of significant injuries when dropped from above. Therefore, it is vitally important for anyone working at height to properly secure tools and other objects so they won’t fall.

Energy sources to TALK ABOUT WITH STAFF are:

Gravity – Enables objects to fall, roofs to collapse and people to trip and fall

Motion – The movement of vehicles, vessels, water, wind or even body movement

 

Two Key Principles

  • Do it safely or not at all.
  • There is always time to do it right.

As a COMPETENT WORKER on and SITE you will ALWAYS:

  1. Operate within design and environmental limits.
  2. Operate in a safe and controlled condition.
  3. Ensure safety devices are in place and functioning.
  4. Follow safe work practices and procedures.
  5. Meet or exceed customer’s requirements.
  6. Maintain integrity of dedicated systems.
  7. Comply with all applicable rules and regulations.
  8. Address abnormal conditions.
  9. Follow written procedures for high risk or unusual situations.
  10. Involve the right people in decisions that affect procedures and equipment.

When using hand tools? Dropped object are:

“Any object, with the potential to cause death, injury or equipment/environmental damage, that falls from its previous static position under its own weight.”

When referring to dropped objects, consider:

  • Hand tools being used at heights
  • Hand tools/equipment left behind after working at height
  • Operations conducted at height
  • Equipment mounted at a height that, following contact, vibration or environmental conditions, could fall, i.e., piping, lights, cameras, rigging gear, etc.
  • Temporary equipment at height
  • Where personnel are working on a level directly below the work site
  • Lifting operations

Always provide training on how to choose the right tool for the job, how to correctly use each tool, and how to identify when tools need repair.

  • Select the right tool for the job. Substitutes increase the chance of having an accident.
  • Use tools designed to allow wrist to stay straight. Avoid using hand tools with your wrist bent.
  • Ensure that employees are properly trained in the safe use of hand tools.
  • Use good quality tools.
  • Keep tools in good condition at all times.
  • Inspect tools for defects before use. Replace or repair defective tools.
  • Keep cutting tools sharp and cover sharp edges with suitable covering to protect the tool and to prevent injuries from unintended contact.
  • Replace cracked, splintered, or broken handles on files, hammers, screwdrivers, or sledges.
  • Ensure that the handles of tools like hammers and axes fit tightly into the head of the tool.
  • Replace worn jaws on wrenches, pipe tools and pliers.
  • Redress burred or mushroomed heads of striking tools.
  • Pull on a wrench or pliers. Never push unless you hold the tool with your palm open.
  • Point sharp tools (e.g., saws, chisels, knives) laying on benches away from aisles and handles should not extend over the edge of the bench top.
  • Maintain tools carefully. Keep them clean and dry, and store them properly after each use.
  • Carry tools in a sturdy tool box to and from the worksite.
  • Wear safety glasses or goggles, or a face shield (with safety glasses or goggles) and well-fitting gloves appropriate for the hazards to which you may be exposed when doing various tasks.
  • Keep the work environment clean and tidy to avoid clutter which may cause accidents.
  • Use a heavy belt or apron and hang tools at your sides, not behind your back.

When and how should you inspect powered hand tools?

  • Inspect tools for any damage prior to each use.
  • Check the handle and body casing of the tool for cracks or other damage.
  • If the tool has auxiliary or double handles, check to see that they installed securely.
  • Inspect cords for defects: check the power cord for cracking, fraying, and other signs of wear or faults in the cord insulation.
  • Check for damaged switches and ones with faulty trigger locks.
  • Inspect the plug for cracks and for missing, loose or faulty prongs.

What should you do if you find a tool defective?

  • If a tool is defective, remove it from service, and tag it clearly “Out of service for repair”.
  • Replace damaged equipment immediately – do not use defective tools “temporarily”.
  • Have tools repaired by a qualified person – do not attempt field repairs.

What should you do before using powered hand tools?

  • Ensure that you have been properly trained to use the tool safely. Read the operator’s manual before using the tool and operate the tool according to the manufacturer’s instructions. Use only tested and approved tools.
  • Ensure that the power tool has the correct guard, shield or other attachment that the manufacturer recommends.
  • Prevent shocks. Ensure that the tools are properly grounded using a three-prong plug, are double-insulated (and are labelled as such), or are powered by a low-voltage isolation transformer: this will protect users from an electrical shock.
  • Check electric tools to ensure that a tool with a 3-prong plug has an approved 3-wire cord and is grounded. The three-prong plug should be plugged in a properly grounded 3-pole outlet. If an adapter must be used to accommodate a two-hole receptacle, the adapter wire must be attached to a known, functioning ground. NEVER remove the third, grounding prong from a plug.
Hammer Safety
  1. Use a claw hammer for pulling nails and for driving nails.
  2. Do not strike nails or other objects with the “cheek” of the hammer.
  3. Do not strike one hammer against another hammer.
  4. Do not use a hammer, screwdriver, file, etc., if your hands are oily, greasy or wet.
Power Drill Safety
  1. Use brushes or vacuum machinery to remove metal chips, shavings and other debris from the drill table. Do not use your bare hands.
  2. Do not use dull, cracked or bent drill bits.
Power Saw Safety
  1. Keep control of saws by releasing downward pressure at the end of the stroke.
  2. Do not use a saw that has a dull blade.
  3. Oil saw blades after each use of the saw.
  4. Keep your hands and fingers away from the saw blade while you are using the saw.
  5. Do not carry a saw by the blade.
Hand Files & Rasp Safety
  1. Do not use a file as a pry bar, hammer, screwdriver or chisel.
  2. When using a file or a rasp, grasp the handle in one hand and the toe of the file in the other.
  3. Do not hammer on a file.
Chisel Safety
  1. Use a chisel that has been sharpened; do not use a chisel that has a dull cutting edge.
  2. Hold a chisel by using a tool holder if possible.
  3. Clamp small work pieces in the vise and chip towards the stationary jaw when you are working with a chisel.
Tool Boxes, Tool Chests & Cabinets
  1. Use the handle when opening and closing a drawer or door of a tool box, chest, or cabinet.
  2. Tape over or file off sharp edges on tool boxes, chests or cabinets.
  3. Do not stand on tool boxes, chests or cabinets to gain extra height.
  4. Lock the wheels on large tool boxes, chests or cabinets to prevent them from rolling.
  5. Push large chests, cabinets and tool boxes; do not pull them.
  6. Do not open more than one drawer of a tool box at a time.
  7. Close and lock all drawers and doors before moving the tool chest to a new location.
  8. Do not use a tool box or chest as a workbench.
  9. Do not move a tool box, chest or cabinet if it has loose tools or parts on the top.
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