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A SWP vs SWP in Health and Safety Programs

When we say safe work practices at work are we really saying safe work procedure or vice versa and what is the key difference for the public and workers!

Many intractable conflicts are fought over the concept of “justice,” but defining exactly what that concept means is very difficult. Sometimes “justice” is defined in terms of equality–everyone should get or have the same amount, regardless of how hard they work, or “what they put in.” Other people define “justice” in terms of equity–people should get benefits in proportion to what they contributed to producing those benefits. In other words, the harder and better you work, the more you should get as a reward for that work. (The opposite can also be argued–that people should suffer costs in proportion to the harm they have done others, which yields the concept of retaliation.) Still other people believe in equity with a bottom “safety-net” level which protects people who, because of misfortune or disability, are unable to work or even help themselves.

There is not any rational way to compare these different approaches, other than to observe that one is more consistent with one culture than another, and that some yield more benefits, or more harm than an other. (The concept of retaliation, while very widespread, tends to cause escalation and can yield enormous harm, for example.) But when people from different cultures come into conflict, as happens so often with minority and ethnic group conflicts, such differing definitions of justice can be very hard to reconcile.

A different use of the term “justice” is also problematic. This involves the concept of criminal justice.

Companies should establish Safe Work Practices/Safe Job Procedures for addressing significant hazards or for dealing with circumstances that may present other significant risks/liabilities for the company. They should reflect your company’s approach to controlling hazards.

Some regulations require employers to have written procedures/instructions for specific activities/conditions. The number of practices/procedures and the degree of detail will depend on the range of work activities your company performs. It is important that management and supervision are involved in the development of safe work practices and that they provide adequate training for workers likely to follow these practices.

Safe work practices are procedures adopted for carrying out specific tasks that ensures workers’ exposure to hazardous situations, substances, and physical agents is controlled in a safe manner.

Safe Work Procedure is a step by step description of a process when deviation may cause a loss. This risk control document created by teams within the company describes the safest and most efficient way to perform a task. Safe Work Procedure (SWP) originated in Victoria, Australia, and is predominantly used as a risk management tool by industries throughout Australia, particularly in the mining sector. SWPs are also referred to using other terms, such as Standard Operating Procedure (SOPre) (SOP). A Safe Work Procedure is a step by step description of a process when deviation may cause a loss. This risk control document created by teams within the company describes the safest and most efficient way to perform a task. This document stays in the Health & Safety system for regular use as a template or guide when completing that particular task on site.

Safe Work Practices

Safe Work Practices (SWP), are a set of guidelines or “Do’s and Don’ts” on how to perform a specific task that may not always be done in the same way and should be developed to mitigate hazards that have been identified through the hazard identification process.

Each employee should know, understand and follow all of the Safe Work Practices that pertain to his/her specific work tasks. Training should be performed in any area that the supervisor and/or employee deems appropriate to ensure competency.  Training should include a theoretical and practical component as outlined in the Safety Orientation and Training element of our health and safety management system and be documented in the employee’s safety training plan. A formal review of all SWP’s, related to the employee’s work tasks, should be performed on an annual basis.

Safe Job Procedures

A Safe Job Procedure (SJP) is a written, specific step-by-step description of how to complete a job safely and efficiently from start to finish.  It is a means of mitigating hazards once they have been identified.  SJP’s should be developed using the job hazard analysis process and implementation and training should be provided for high priority hazards that have been identified through the hazard identification process.

Each employee should know, understand and follow all of the SJP that pertain to his specific work tasks.  Training should be performed in any area that the supervisor and/or employee deems appropriate to ensure competency.  Training should include a theoretical and practical component as outlined in the “Safety Orientation and Training” element of our health and safety management system and should be documented in the employee’s safety training plan.  A formal review of all SJP’s related to the employee’s work tasks, should be performed on an annual basis

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